Progression

This page collates the benchmark trends analysis across the last three years.
Key findings
•    BAME employees are less likely to be rated in the top two performance rating categories•    No significant difference in overall appraisal ratings between men and women •    Women and BAME employees are less likely to be identified as ‘high potential’ or be selected for leadership training overall•    Public sector is more likely to identify women and men as ‘high potential’ in similar proportions •    Public sector is less likely to identify BAME as ‘high potential’ in similar proportions as white employees •    Future leadership pipeline within the private sector is imbalanced for gender and race •    Appraisal mechanisms feeding into leadership are more likely to rate women and BAME employees less favourably
114 organisations took part in the 2014 Gender and Race Benchmark; 27 from the public sector and 87 from the private sector. 86 organisations submitted data on ethnicity. 
 
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If you are serious about change, you as Partners and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to a core business priority.
Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged.




There’s a real issue with private practice, and top firms are particularly challenging for women. I believe the reason is there’s an inherently male culture in these sorts of firms, where the sacrifices that you are expected to make to progress - and the whole chargeable hours structure that rewards putting in the long hours - means that long hours are rewarded.




- Focus Group Participant

Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment; send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality. Provide informal methods of reporting.
Consult with women in your organisation about the changes they would like see to enable more women to succeed.
Implement more job share roles. We have seen this successfully piloted in management consultancies, with job sharing consultants managing one project and communicating this upfront with the client.
Ensure accountability at Partner level on meeting gender targets and set objectives for this, just as you have for billing.

If you are serious about change, you as Service Chiefs and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to an operational effectiveness priority.Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment. Send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality.Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged. Look at job design, technology and agile teams, and defeat the flexible working stigma that holds women – and men – back.Recognise that working in a male dominated culture places specific and additional demands upon female personnel. This requires you to consult with women in your organisation to develop your understanding of what it is like to be a woman in a man's world. These women have expressed genuine concerns that you need to address.

 


If you are serious about change, CEOs and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to a core business priority. Set aspirational targets for the numbers of women you want to see at each senior level in your organisation.
Prioritise the development of excellent managers at every level of your organisation
Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged. Look at job design, technology, agile teams, and defeat the flexible working stigma that holds women back. Allow for non linear careers – your top talent will have times in their lives they need to take a step back.
Recognise that harassment and bullying still occurs, despite well-meaning policies. Call it out, deal with perpetuators, and make it simple and straightforward to report.
28 – 40 women: Build your network – be in a position to know about opportunities as they come up. Get real on sponsorship – identify senior people who will advocate for you. If you want a mentor, ask them.
The UK’s current and future talent pool is changing, as is today’s business environment and so the business imperative to adapt and develop the workplace has never been greater.
What are the key features of the 21st Century Workforce- its challenges and opportunities?
What should UK business do to remain highly productive and competitive amidst tough trading conditions and a rapidly changing marketplace?
In the 21st Century Workforce, flexibility becomes the norm, not the exception and a source of competitive advantage.
Read and download the research to learn what business can do to create an agile workforce.
Useful statistics and actions on how to address occupational segregation in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics industries.