Diversity Issues

 
Over three years, benchmarking organisations have recorded benefits of agile working: 47% have seen an increase in morale, 39% have seen increased retention, and 36% have seen reduced absenteeism
Organisations with more female managers are more likely to highlight senior agile workers as role models (61% of these organisations do this)
Organisations with more female managers are more likely to invest in technology to make agile working viable (89% of these organisations do this)
The proportion of male agile workers (21.4%) in benchmarking organisations is catching up with the proportion of women (35.1%), particularly in the public sector at 29.5% and 36.3% respectively
 
Key findings
Unconscious bias continues to play a role during all the stages of recruitment of BAME candidates, from application, through shortlisting and interview to job offer.
There is a significant drop-off in the proportion of BAME graduates and apprentices progressing from application to hire stages of recruitment.
White candidates overall tend to progress from application to hire in similar proportions. This proportion increases among apprenticeship applications and is largest among graduate applicants.
The number of organisations ensuring ethnically diverse interview panels (where possible) has nearly doubled in three years (2012 – 2014), but fewer than 50% of organisations ensure this
Organisations where the rate of conversion from applying to being hired is similar between BAME and white candidates do the following:
- Target diverse candidates at recruitment fairs;- Mandate unconscious bias training during recruitment;- Ensure ethnically diverse recruitment panels;- Use a variety of recruitment sources to attract a wider pool of applicants.
Key findings
•    BAME women are least likely to hold executive directorships and non- executive directorships•    BAME women are more likely to be promoted than BAME men •    Executive directorships are less likely to be diverse by gender and ethnicity than non-executive directorships•    White employees are more likely to be promoted than all other groups 
 
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Key findings
•    Women are twice as likely to make formal complaints than men •    BAME employees are more likely to make formal complaints than white employees•    BAME women are most likely to make a formal complaint •    Organisations are taking more steps to turn ‘zero-tolerance’ policy into lived reality •    Increase in number of organisations monitoring and action planning to make proactive interventions 
114 organisations took part in the 2014 Gender and Race Benchmark; 27 from the public sector and 87 from the private sector. 86 organisations submitted data on ethnicity. 
 
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If you are serious about change, you as Partners and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to a core business priority.
Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged.




There’s a real issue with private practice, and top firms are particularly challenging for women. I believe the reason is there’s an inherently male culture in these sorts of firms, where the sacrifices that you are expected to make to progress - and the whole chargeable hours structure that rewards putting in the long hours - means that long hours are rewarded.




- Focus Group Participant

Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment; send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality. Provide informal methods of reporting.
Consult with women in your organisation about the changes they would like see to enable more women to succeed.
Implement more job share roles. We have seen this successfully piloted in management consultancies, with job sharing consultants managing one project and communicating this upfront with the client.
Ensure accountability at Partner level on meeting gender targets and set objectives for this, just as you have for billing.

If you are serious about change, you as Service Chiefs and senior leaders need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to an operational effectiveness priority.Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment. Send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality.Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged. Look at job design, technology and agile teams, and defeat the flexible working stigma that holds women – and men – back.Recognise that working in a male dominated culture places specific and additional demands upon female personnel. This requires you to consult with women in your organisation to develop your understanding of what it is like to be a woman in a man's world. These women have expressed genuine concerns that you need to address.

If you are serious about change, you as CEO's need to take the lead on women’s progression, moving this from a diversity initiative to a core business priority.




Without senior women, why would you think you can progress? You need to see them at all levels so you know you can be there too.




- Focus Group Participant

Create a truly agile organisation, with women and men able to work in a way that makes them productive and engaged.
Demonstrate visible leadership in tackling bullying, harassment and sexual harassment; send a clear message to all employees that poor behaviour should be called out and turn ‘zero tolerance’ policy into a reality. Provide informal methods of reporting.
Consult with women in your organisation about the changes they would like see to enable more women to succeed.
For the purposes of our analyis and report, we refer to this group of industries collectively as the STEM sector:  This includes, Construction, Manufacturing, Oil, Gas, Electricity, Water Supply, Waste Management, Scientific & Technical Services and Telecommunications / Information Technology.