Diversity & Inclusion


Entry for The Times Top 50 Employers for Women 2020 opens in October 2019. Sign up here to stay updated.

The Times Top 50 Employers for Women 2019: Best in Class - Insights Report 2019 is for organisations who want to learn from the success and impact of others to continue their journey towards workplace equality. The report outlines some of the most effective approaches and highlights best practice examples, with in-depth analysis into particularly important areas.
 
The report uses the data submitted by applicants for The Times Top 50 Employers for Women 2019, the UK’s most highly profiled and well-established listing of employers leading the way on workplace gender equality. It finds culture and behavioural change is an underlying theme which connected all the organisations who achieved impact, despite the differences in approaches, sectors and industries. 
 
The Times Top 50 Employers for Women application process asks organisation what they are doing to become a top employer for women. In particular:
What policies and processes are in place and how they are encouraging a culture that enables these
What impact these activities and initiatives are having
The process also asks organisations to answer a range of questions focusing on: strategy and accountability; data monitoring and transparency; policies and processes; workplace culture and wider reach.
 
Join Business in the Community (BITC) Scotland and special guest speaker, Lauren Chiren of Women of a Certain Stage, to find out how you can ensure your business is ready, willing and able to support women experiencing menopause. 
Gender pay gap reporting alone is not enough and should include a clear narrative and action plan with time-bound targets. Action plans need to be communicated transparently internally and externally.
You’ve calculated your gender pay gap and identified the biggest causes, now it’s time to publish. How will you communicate this internally and externally, to everyone from your employees to the media? The third toolkit in the gender pay gap reporting series offers guidance on how to communicate your pay gap internally and externally, where to publish it and crucially, how to write your accompanying narrative.
You’ve calculated your gender pay gap and identified the biggest causes, now it’s time to publish. How will you communicate this internally and externally, to everyone from your employees to the media? The third toolkit in the gender pay gap reporting series offers guidance on how to communicate your pay gap internally and externally, where to publish it and crucially, how to write your accompanying narrative.
This toolkit provides guidance, advice and best practice on how to equalise the earnings and positions of women and men in your organisation and close your gender pay gap.
You’ve calculated your gender pay gap, now you can explore the data in more detail. Why, in 2019, do women earn on average less than men and what’s driving your gender pay gap?
LGBT+ people make up between 2-5% of the population of the UK but are still experiencing high levels of discrimination in the workplace and significant inequalities, especially around mental health and wellbeing.
Working with Pride combines insights from two of BITC’s flagship studies (Mental Health at Work and Equal Lives) produced in partnership with Mercer Marsh and Santander, to shine a light on the issues facing LGBT+ people in the workplace. The report finds that:
Nearly three-quarters of LGBT+ people said that they had experienced mental health problems relating to work (74%)
Experience of mental health issues was a third higher among LGBT+ employees
Younger LGBT+ employees were found to be particularly vulnerable
Gay & bi+ employees are not accessing carers’ support as much as their colleagues
Based on the findings in this report we have made three core recommendations for businesses to act upon: Recognise, Respond and Role Model.