What Holds Women Back-Barriers to Workplace Progression

Executive Summary / Introduction

What holds women back?  Men and womens perceptions of the barriers to workplace progression.

This research examines the perceptions of the barriers to diversity and women's progression in Opportunity Now organisations.The most striking trend in this research is the fact men are consistently less likely than women (in most cases less than half as likely) to recognise any of the barriers to gender diversity and women's progression

 

 

This research follows up similar research conducted in 2005  (Line Managers and Diversity)
Neither the barriers nor the perception gap have diminished over the past five years and in some cases  the situation has got worse.  The implications of failing to address this issue go far beyond the disappointments and frustrations of these women's careers. We risk wasting the talents of another generation of women and leaving the board rooms of UK organisations without the diversity of skills, talents and experiences that will enrich decision making, enhance innovation and make the UK more competitive in the future.
The most striking trend in this research is the fact that men are consistently less likely than women (in most cases less than half as likely) to recognise any of the barriers to gender diversity and women's progression:

Women have to balance work and family:
82% of women recognise this as a barrier but just 54% of men.

Women are seen as less committed to work because they often have family commitments:
57% of women recognise this as barrier but 20% of men.

Lack of senior or visibly successful female role models:
52% of women recognise this as a barrier but just 26% of men.

Stereotyping and preconceptions of womens roles and abilities:
49% of women recognise  this as a barrier but just 14% of men.

Personal style differences:
48% of women recognise this as a barrier but just 21% of men

 

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What Holds Women Back?